Securing Bind 9 with AppArmor and Firejail

Securing Bind 9 with AppArmor and Firejail

This is a small excerpt from a ISC Security Series webinar titled “Securing Bind 9 with AppArmor and Firejail”. ISC is a non-profit organization that develops several widely used open source software packages such as BIND 9, ISC DHCP, and Kea DHCP.

Firejail profile used in the video:

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Jolla/Sailfish OS 4.0.1 Koli is now available

There are many reasons to choose Sailfish OS over other mobile operating systems, but at Jolla we never forget that privacy and control are things our customers care deeply about. That’s because we care deeply about them too, and that’s why we’ve introduced Firejail app sandboxing into Sailfish OS 4 Koli.

When you first run an application, the Firejail app sandbox will make clear which permissions an application needs in order to run. A Firejailed app is prevented from accessing any of the functionality not granted on the list. Why is that important? We know Jolla developers are trustworthy, but there’s always the possibility someone will release an app containing rogue code, or with an accidental vulnerability for an attacker to exploit. If this happens, it’s reassuring to know the app is confined to minimise any harm it can do.

Some users may be concerned that this increasing security and privacy may impact the control you have over your own device. Rest assured this is not the case. With developer mode activated you’re still free to execute apps outside the sandbox if you prefer. In contrast to other mobile operating systems we want all Sailfish OS users to have full control of their devices, while ensuring malicious hackers don’t.

In the latest release many of the Jolla apps are sandboxed by default, but we’re not yet applying this to third party apps. Sandboxing prevents the use of boosters and QML pre-compilation, with a performance penalty we’re working to avoid. Restricting its use initially to a selected set of apps will give us the chance to iron out some of these kinks before we activate it for third party apps in a future release.

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SafetyDetectives: 5 Best Antivirus Protection for Linux

After years of using Linux on my main computer, I got really tired of seeing how many low-quality Linux antivirus programs were floating around the internet. While Linux is much more secure than other operating systems, I kept finding vulnerabilities that I was struggling to patch.

One of the reasons for this is that there simply aren’t very many antivirus scanners for Linux. While malware is still an issue, Linux users don’t face the same risks as PC and Mac users, so we need to utilize other cybersecurity tools to harden our devices.

I spent a long time finding the best free Linux cybersecurity tools on the internet. After testing 29 different programs, I’ve come up with some rock-solid programs to help bulk up security on my Linux machine.

  • ClamAV: Open-source freeware antivirus scanner with a GUI.
  • Sophos: Free for one user, scan and remove malware, command line only.
  • Firetools: Sandboxing software prevents malicious web scripts with a GUI.
  • Rootkit Hunter: Behavior-based rootkit scanning, command line only.
  • Qubes: A distro designed to keep your computer as secure as possible.

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Firejail on Linux to sandbox all the things

Firejail is a program that can prepare sandboxes to run other programs. This is an efficient way to keep a software isolated from the rest of the system without need of changing its source code, it works for network, graphical or daemons programs.

You may want to sandbox programs you run in order to protect your system for any issue that could happen within the program (security breach, code mistake, unknown errors), like Steam once had a “rm -fr /” issue, using a sandbox that would have partially saved a part of the user directory. Web browsers are major tools nowadays and yet they have access to the whole system and have many security issues discovered and exploited in the wild, running it in a sandbox can reduce the data a hacker could exfiltrate from the computer. Of course, sandboxing comes with an usability tradeoff because if you only allow access to the ~/Downloads/ directory, you need to put files in this directory if you want to upload them, and you can only download files into this directory and then move them later where you really want to keep your files.

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Securely Run Programs In Linux Mint Using Firetools

For running applications sandboxed in Linux, Firetools is a good utility to do so. Sandboxing is essentially restricting applications in their own space and thereby limiting their reach to the overall system. This is a security layer to prevent any malicious programs to have full access to the system.

Firetools is a graphical front-end for the command-line sandboxing tool Firejail.

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Firejail Tips and Tricks

 

Mainly Tor and DNS because that’s what I’ve been doing lately.

 

Cleanup

Before we start, let’s get into the habit of cleaning up some files when we shut down the computer. For this you need a systemd unit file (see Appendix 1) and a simple script (see Apendix 2). Copy the unit file in /etc/systemd/system directory, and the script in /etc. The contents of the script is as follows:

rm -fr /home/netblue/.cache

.cache directory is the place where people find copies of all the webpages you visited, torrent trackers you connected to, and all that emails you thought you deleted – all 3 GB of them!

After that, take a look at /etc/machine-id. This is a world-readable file containing a huge random number:

$ cat /etc/machine-id
0b46feb27a20469da0ee62baaeb51c5c

Sort of a serial number, it is used to uniquely identify Linux computers. You definitely don’t want it on your home network. But since it is required by systemd, generate a new one on shutdown. Actually, there is another copy of this file in /var/lib/dbus/machine-id, so you have to deal with both of them:

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