Category Archives: Firetools

SafetyDetectives: 5 Best Antivirus Protection for Linux

After years of using Linux on my main computer, I got really tired of seeing how many low-quality Linux antivirus programs were floating around the internet. While Linux is much more secure than other operating systems, I kept finding vulnerabilities that I was struggling to patch.

One of the reasons for this is that there simply aren’t very many antivirus scanners for Linux. While malware is still an issue, Linux users don’t face the same risks as PC and Mac users, so we need to utilize other cybersecurity tools to harden our devices.

I spent a long time finding the best free Linux cybersecurity tools on the internet. After testing 29 different programs, I’ve come up with some rock-solid programs to help bulk up security on my Linux machine.

  • ClamAV: Open-source freeware antivirus scanner with a GUI.
  • Sophos: Free for one user, scan and remove malware, command line only.
  • Firetools: Sandboxing software prevents malicious web scripts with a GUI.
  • Rootkit Hunter: Behavior-based rootkit scanning, command line only.
  • Qubes: A distro designed to keep your computer as secure as possible.

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Securely Run Programs In Linux Mint Using Firetools

For running applications sandboxed in Linux, Firetools is a good utility to do so. Sandboxing is essentially restricting applications in their own space and thereby limiting their reach to the overall system. This is a security layer to prevent any malicious programs to have full access to the system.

Firetools is a graphical front-end for the command-line sandboxing tool Firejail.

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LinuxLinks: Essential System Tools: Firejail – Excellent Security Sandboxing


What makes Firejail so special it qualifies for inclusion in our Essential System Tools feature? Above all, it puts users first.

It’s really easy to install and use. More time to spend actually using software. Most people won’t need any custom configuration. There’s a wide range of software which come with sandbox profiles.

The software helps to reduce the risk of security breaches. It’s lightweight and while it uses CPU cycles, the overhead is remarkably low. Firejail sandboxes do not each run their own copy of a full-blown operating system. Instead they operate in a resource-isolated environment created by standard facilities of your system’s existing Linux kernel. As such, despite the high level of protection offered, the overhead of running a Firejail sandbox is extremely low. So your software, including games, run at full steam, unlike a full virtualisation environment.

Firejail is an excellent tool for the security conscious. While it adds a layer of protection, you should use it with other security tools. We use it mainly for web browsing, and to lock down services.

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